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Thought Field Therapy for Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia: A Pilot Study

Citation: Darby, D. & Hartung, J. (2012). Thought field therapy for blood-injection-injury phobia: A pilot study. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 4(1), 25-32. Click here to view Abstract http://goo.gl/hIgI0I

Abstract

Blood-injection-injury phobia, or needle phobia, may affect 10% of a population, at times leading to life-threatening impairment when people avoid needle-mediated prevention or treatment. Twenty needle-phobic persons, serving as their own controls, were treated for 1 hr with Thought Field Therapy (TFT).

Symptoms were assessed using the Fear Schedule Survey and a Likert scale. Significant improvement in symptoms was noted from pre- to posttest and on 1-month follow-up.

The results are consistent with other reports of TFTs efficacy in reducing fear symptoms and warrant the design of a randomized trial to determine whether TFT is efficacious when tested under controlled conditions.

Craig’s Comments

In this 2012 study, thirty individuals with needle phobia had a 1 hour Thought Field Therapy (TFT) session. The study results showed a significant improvement in fear symptoms, as measured by two subjective intake methods, related to the needle phobia that were maintained after 1 month after the session. This study was consistent with other reports of TFT’s efficacy on fear reduction and the author recommends that a randomized control trial be done to test the results further.