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Psychological Symptom Change after Group Application of Emotional Freedom Techniques

Follow Up to Rowe 2012 Study on the Effectiveness of Group Administered EFT in a Workshop Setting for the Reduction of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

Citation: Palmer-Hoffman, J., & Brooks, A. (2011). Psychological Symptom Change after Group Application of Emotional Freedom Techniques. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 3(1), 57-72. Click here to view Abstract http://goo.gl/Lhcb9Z

Abstract

A study by J. E. Rowe (2005) examined the effects of Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) on psychological conditions such as depression and anxiety. The sample (N = 102) consisted of participants at a weekend workshop taught by Gary Craig, the originator of EFT. Rowe found significant improvements in psychological symptoms from pre- to post-workshop assessments, with significant participant gains maintained on follow-up. The current study examined whether the improvements were attributable to Gary Craig alone or whether similar effects are noted when EFT is delivered by others. This study examined samples of participants at 4 different conferences, in which EFT was taught by others (N = 102). In all 4 conferences, there were significant improvements in the severity and breadth of symptoms pre- and post-workshop (p < .001), and following 3 of the 4 conferences there were significant long-term gains (p < .001). The results indicate that EFT may be effective at reducing psychological symptoms when delivered by individuals other than the method’s founder and that EFT may reliably improve long-term mental health when delivered in brief group treatments.

Editor’s Note

This 2011 study is a follow-up investigation to the earlier 2005 study by Rowe who looked at the significant pre and post ameliorative effects of EFT on depression and anxiety in a workshop setting led by EFT founder, Gary Craig. This updated study explored whether the significance of the results from Rowe’s study may have been attributable to the significance of the effect of Gary Craig himself leading the workshop or whether the same results could be achieved by others. 102 participants at four different conferences were measured for pre and post workshop symptoms using subjective questionnaires. In all 4 of the conference groups, significant improvements were made in the severity and breadth of symptoms pre and post workshop and in 3 of the 4 groups, long term gains were achieved. The conclusion was “The results indicate that EFT may be effective at reducing psychological symptoms when delivered by individuals other than the method’s founder and that EFT may reliably improve long-term mental health when delivered in brief group treatments.”