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Efficacy of EFT in Reducing Public Speaking Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial; Jones, Thornton & Andrews

Citation: Jones, S., Thornton, J., & Andrews, H. (2011). Efficacy of EFT in Reducing Public Speaking Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, Treatment, 3(1). Click here to view Abstract http://goo.gl/u4BEFW

Abstract

Thirty six volunteers with Public Speaking Anxiety (PSA) were randomly allocated into a treatment group and wait-list control group. Subjective self-report measures were taken before, during, and after a forty-five minute treatment session with Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT). Behavioral observations were recorded during a 4-minute speech immediately after treatment.

Comparisons between groups revealed significant reductions in PSA on all self-report measures, but not in behavioral observations. Changes in scores taken before and after treatment for each participant revealed significant reduction in PSA on all subjective and behavioral measures.

A significant reduction in PSA as measured by Subjective Units of Discomfort was demonstrated within the first 15 minutes of treatment with EFT, with further significant reductions also demonstrated at 30 and 45 minutes. EFT was found to be a quick and effective treatment for PSA.

Editor’s Note

36 university students with Public Speaking Anxiety were randomly place into either an experimental (received a single 45 minute EFT session by one of 3 university psychologists trained in EFT) or wait list control group. Subjective measurements of distress were taken before, during and after the session. All students were then to give a 4 minute presentation on any topic in front of 3 strangers/observers and a video camera and were observed for behavioral signs of distress. Significant results in self-reported decreases in anxiety and increased confidence as a speaker were noted, though behavioral observation scoring did not reveal a statistically significant difference between the two groups.