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A Feasibility Study: Emotional Freedom Techniques for Depression in Australian Adults; Stapleton, et al 2014

Stapleton, P., Devine, S., Chatwin, H., Porter, B. and Sheldon, T. 2014. A feasibility study: emotional freedom techniques for depression in Australian adults. Curr. Res. Psychol., 5: 19-33. Click here to read Abstract http://goo.gl/bNZP8y and to read Full Paper http://goo.gl/KKQOo2

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using Clinical Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) to treat Major Depressive Disorder in an adult population by way of a therapeutic group setting. Adults were assigned to EFT group treatment for a period of eight weeks. Diagnostic assessment was completed immediately pre and post treatment using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. In addition to this, self-report assessments measuring symptomatic evidence of depression were completed by the participants before the treatment, after the treatment and at three month follow-up. Comparisons with a community group were made at pre and post intervention and three month follow-up. The results indicated a change in diagnosis in each of the participants, with data indicating an overall improvement for the treatment group for depressive symptoms. Study implications and limitations are discussed.

Editor’s Note

This study, with lead researcher and EFTU trainer Peta Stapleton, was designed to investigate the use of Clinical Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) to treat Major Depressive Disorder in adults using a therapeutic group setting. …..# Adults were assigned to EFT group treatment for a period of eight weeks and diagnostic assessment was made immediately pre and post treatment using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Beyond this assessment, self-report assessments measuring symptomatic evidence of depression were completed by the participants before the treatment, after the treatment and at three month follow-up. These results were compared to a non-treated community group who also received pre and post intervention and three month follow-up evaluations. The results indicated a change in diagnosis in each of the participants, with data indicating an overall improvement for the treatment group for depressive symptoms.